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Try something a little different with your travel photography: take the time to find a fresh perspective or new style of photography, or experiment with different lenses.

1. FIND DIFFERENT ANGLES

LOOK AT YOUR SURROUNDING FROM NEW POINTS OF VIEW

It’s easy to keep taking the same type of shots from the same angles, but try not to limit yourself to one perspective. When travelling, you may have limited time in one spot, but take some time to really look at your environment.

KIT NEEDED: CAMERA AND ZOOM LENS

Martina recommends the OM-D E-M1 Mark II or OM-D E-M10 Mark III and the M.ZUIKO 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO

It can be easy to fall into a rut with your photography if you are taking the same types of photos over and over again from the same angle – usually eye level. It’s worth trying something new and challenging yourself to look a little harder before you start taking photos.

I like to travel with as little camera gear as possible, so consider what you want to capture when you travel. Make use of available light and how it interacts with your shot. The M.ZUIKO 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO is a super lens as it allows you to really close in on details without losing any sharpness. Try using your camera’s tilting screen to allow you to take those photos that you would otherwise have to strain your neck or crouch down to take.

2. CREATE A SENSE OF SCALE

CREATE DEPTH AND SHARPNESS STACKING EASILY HANDHELD

When thinking what gear to pack for your travels, consider taking a wider lens. This will mean you can fit more into your frame and experiment with being more creative with your shot, so you can capture a scene that will really draw the eye.

KIT NEEDED: CAMERA AND WIDE ANGLE LENS

Martina recommends the OM-D E-M1 Mark II or OM-D E-M10 Mark III and the M.ZUIKO 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO

In the past I have felt that I wanted to capture more of a scene than my lens allowed me to whilst on my travels. There is a certain art to shooting with a wide-angle lens, as it means that you can focus on your subject while also capturing the vast background, without losing any of the details. This can give your photos an instant ‘wow’ factor and allow you to create drama in your shots with little or no extra effort.

This doesn’t mean that you have to shoot as wide as possible all the time, but I find that the M.ZUIKO 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO is a great travel companion as it is versatile enough to allow you get those wide shots, even in the most challenging of light situations.

3. TIMING IS EVERYTHING

USE HIGH-SPEED SHOOTING TO AVOID MISSING THE SHOT

One of the best things about macro photography is that it can take something that we see every day and give it a whole new look and feel. Details that are usually too small to notice can be lifted to a whole new level.

KIT NEEDED: CAMERA AND ZOOM LENS

Martina recommends the OM-D E-M1 Mark II or OM-D E-M10 Mark III and the M.ZUIKO 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO

Sometimes, when you’re out in a new environment with your camera, you can see the potential for a shot developing. When this happens it helps to use the tools that are available to you, especially if you have to wait a while for the moment to occur. The high-speed sequential shooting feature, for example, allows you to capture a number of shots by pressing and holding the shutter down, so you can get the shot that you are waiting for.

Whilst travelling and taking shots like this, you also want to be as discreet as possible, which is why I also like to use silent mode. I most commonly use the M.ZUIKO 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO lens as this gives me option to take a shot that I may crop down later, while maintaining sharpness. The constant f/2.8 means that I can shoot all day and in difficult light conditions with confidence, and it’s small enough to fit in my bag without drawing the sort of attention the equivalent DSLR lens and camera combination would.

You can see more from Martina on InstagramTwitter or by visiting yeszebra.com.

Article featured in Olympus Magazine Issue 64 – to see the latest copy of this free digital magazine click here.