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Landscape photography can require some real dedication to find the perfect spot with the perfect conditions. Next time you’re out, try these landscape projects from Tom Ormerod.

1. GET DOWN LOW

USE YOUR ARTICULATED SCREEN TO GET AN ALTERNATIVE PERSPECTIVE

When arriving in the field assess your surroundings and look for compositions that accentuate subjects by shooting low and wide. Use your articulated screen to shoot without being a contortionist or lying in the mud.

KIT NEEDED: CAMERA AND ZOOM LENS

Tom recommends the OM-D E-M5 Mark II or OM-D E-M1 Mark II

I often see photographers arrive in the field, set up their tripods that are bigger than they are and shoot at eye level. While this has its place, I love to get low and up close with my subjects. This often has the effect of perspective in a landscape and can really lead the viewer into the picture. By utilising the articulated screens on all Olympus OM-D cameras you can frame your shot with ease. The fully articulated screens on the OM-D E-M5 Mark II and OM-D E-M1 Mark II really work well handheld with the fantastic in-body image stabilisation, or paired with a good-quality tripod. This is effective with detailed subjects, such as rocks and flowers, and a wide-angle lens – shoot at around f/11 to ensure a good depth-of-field for landscape shots.

2. CAPTURE WAVE MOVEMENT

CONTROL YOUR SHUTTER SPEED TO CAPTURE MOTION IN WATER

The motion of the waves is one of the most satisfying things to shoot. Learn how to control your shutter speed so that next time you’re at the coast you can capture the perfect wave movement in your images.

KIT NEEDED: CAMERA AND WIDE ANGLE LENS

Tom recommends the OM-D E-M5 Mark II or OM-D E-M1 Mark II and the M.ZUIKO 12-30mm f/2.8 PRO

Wave movement is something I love to shoot. Capturing the perfect flow is really tricky but when you get it right, you’ll have a big smile and a sense of real achievement. The problem is, no two waves are the same, so an element of trail and error is involved. I always recommend that people start at 0.5 seconds shutter speed and slow it down more if the waves are slow or speed it up if the waves are fast.

The same goes for rivers; water moving over rocks creates wonderful trails but you will need to adjust your shutter based on the speed of the water. If you are not confident with manual mode, try using shutter priority with an ISO of 200 or less – this should adjust your aperture appropriately. Unless you are using ND filters you may find this tricky in brighter conditions but lenses like the M.ZUIKO 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO, that perform well even when stopped right down, can help a lot too.

3. GET UP EXTRA EARLY

USE HIGH-SPEED SHOOTING TO AVOID MISSING THE SHOT

Many people wake early to capture the rising sun, but don’t forget that some of the best colour can occur well before sunrise itself. Get up and into the field as soon as you can and be ready to photograph those colourful skies.

KIT NEEDED: CAMERA AND ZOOM LENS

Tom recommends the OM-D E-M5 Mark II or OM-D E-M1 Mark II and the M.ZUIKO 12-30mm f/2.8 PRO

OK, this isn’t as much of a technical project but for many (myself included) it is a continual challenge. I meet many photographers that arrive in the field just in time for sunrise or equally pack up and leave straight after sunset. But some of the best colour I have ever seen has been 20 minutes before sunrise or 20 minutes after sunset. So with this in mind I always aim to be on-site around 40 minutes before sunrise… not so bad in the winter when the sun rises at 8am but a whole different challenge in the summer when the sun rises as early as 4:50am. Add on a drive plus a 40-minute walk and a 2:15am alarm can be required….but it can be worth it (just)! Watch the forecasts and look for high cloud before sunrise for extra colour or high humidity with low wind for the possibility of mist, and the rewards can be fantastic.

You can see more from Tom on InstagramFacebook or by visiting tomormerod.com.

Article featured in Olympus Magazine Issue 65 – to see the latest copy of this free digital magazine click here.